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of the c.i.a. and continue to work with in this capacity. and i always found him to be very responsible about how we can effectively conduct operations against al qaeda and against those that would attack this country. he is somebody a straight shooter, somebody who gives you his best opinion. he doesn't play games. he's someone who i think can really honestly represent the best protection of this country in that job. >> thank you very much. and i want to thank you for your forth right comments today about the sequester. ironically as what you said in your statement, it appears the greatest threat to the united states security is the united states congress. thank you, mr. secretary. >> thank you. let me mention this, after senator nelson, the first round will be over. there may be a number of us who may want a few minutes on the second round and you two witnesses have been here for three hours and you may need a five or 10-minute break. do you want that following senator nelson or go right through? i can't guarantee how many senators will come back and want two or three minutes each. >>
, the nominee to the cia, testified today at his confirmation hearing. the topic of drone strikes came app. dianne feinstein said she will look into new legislation to govern overseas strikes. there was an interruption by protesters. it is three and a half hours. >> you are a disgrace to democracy. >> if the police will clear the room, please. will clear the room, please. [indiscernible] [shouting continues] >> [indiscernible] please clear the room. >> [indiscernible] please clear the room. [protest continues] all right, i think we should clear the entire room and then let people back in. what do you think? >> we need more capital police. >> yeah, let's -- [indiscernible] ok, we will try and start. ok, we will i am going to began this -- begin this hearing, and let me say right up front that the process is that people are respectful, that they do not shout, they do not hiss, they do not show signs, that this is to listen. if that is a problem for anybody, i ask you to leave their room now. -- the room now. what we will do is remove you from the room. let there be no doubt. so if i may, i w
of twitter and other social media. now, a former cia officials for the george w. bush administration defend the use of enhanced interrogations' in the search for osama bin laden. michael hitt and joins former cia counsel who provides the bush administration on interrogations'. . and jose rodriguez. the american enterprise institute hosts this 90 minute of that. >> good morning. welcome to this morning's panel. separating fact from fiction. i am a member of a task force on detention and interrogation policy. captain bigelow's recent film sparked controversy. recentryn bigelow's film sparked controvery. its graphic depiction of eight torture. for the most part, the outrage has come from the left. you are a conservative like me, when you see the washington left with the hollywood left, your temptation is to sit back and destroyed a fight. -- and enoy the fight. that is why many of the cia and defenders and supporters stayed out of this debate. i interrupt while the progressives are fighting it out. but the fact is, culture matters. many americans will form their opinions based on what they see
. there were directly involved in the cia integration and detention program. also the hunt for osama bin laden. mike is the former director of the national security agency and the director of the intelligence agency. i got to know him back in 2006, when i was asked to write the president's speech revealing the existence of the interrogation program. he was very kind to give me access to all the intelligence and introduced me to the men and women who conducted the interrogation. but he is not only one of the smartest people i know. he is one of the most compelling witnesses. when he came into the office, the program had been suspended. he was not involved in its initial creation. he conducted a partial assessment. he gathered all the information and had to advise the president whether or not to restart it. he concluded he could not advise the president not to have an interrogation program. we will ask him to explain why that is. jose rodriguez is the former director of the cia service. he was an undercover officer, becoming the head of the cia's counter-terrorism center. including the interroga
. bruce was a 30-year cia veteran before joining brookings in 2006. at the cia, he did a number of things, including working at nato headquarters. he was an advisor to four presidents. he led the afghanistan-pakistan review. bruce has written two books in his time here. a third is about to come out. the first two were about al qaeda. the search for al qaeda and the deadly embrace. the new book coming out next month is "avoiding armageddon." it is about the u.s.-pakistan relationship. general stanley mcchrystal spent 34 years in the military. he was the director of the joint staff. in military circles, this five- year period of joint special operations command is what makes them memorable and historic. the reality is that he has done more to carry the fight to al qaeda since 2001 than any other person in this department, possibly in the country. after that, bob gates got up, and the secretary of defense called him one of the finest men at arms this country as ever produced, then continued over the past decade, no single american has inflicted more fear and more loss of life on our country
attacked and also facing scrutiny was nominee for cia director. one of the things he talked about is how much of the public and congress should know about the u.s. drove stride program. we would like to hear your opinion. what is the balance between government secrecy and the public's right to know? here are the numbers to call -- you can also find us online -- here is the headline in "the baltimore sun" this morning. brennan targeted over drones. looking at some of the opinions coming in on the editorial pages of the newspapers. "usa today" -- that is of the newspaper's editorial board opinion. jumping down, it says -- the opposing view that "usa today" publishes to give a counterpoint says end the u.s. -- covert drone war. naureen shah at columbia's human-rights institute writes -- she points out the war is waged secretly because the pakistani and yemen government have the time feared their citizens would oppose open u.s. and all -- involvement. what do you think? what is more important, government secrecy or the public's right to know? let's hear from walter from butler, indiana. a re
for the job -- brennan and his suitability for the job of c.i.a. director. mr. speaker, may i commend to my colleagues on both sides of capitol hill recording -- capitol hill regarding this issue and to the american people a powerful new documentary that examines in part some of the issues i have discussed today and their grave implications for our national security, public safety and freedoms. this documentary, called the grand deception, is a product of counterterrorism expert steven emerson's investigative project on terrorism. and it provides critical insights into the true nature of the, quote, global jihadist threat. including its expanding successes overseas and the danger it poses here at home. it chronicles the history of what i believe has been an officially sanked and willful blindness to that threat. it also lays bare the various ways in which such a practice is contributing to the emboldinning of our enemies, the undermining of our allies the steady erosion of our economy and our security. mr. speaker, let me close by noting as the previous gentleman did that today is ronald re
to the cia fact book, literacy rate overall is 20%. given those numbers, how difficult is it your job of getting information to afghanis? guest: when you see almost 28% of the country is illiterate, meaning more than 72% mark is illiterate, that means we are faced with people they are not easy to receive things or digest things, so it is very hard in a country like afghanistan with the fact that more than 70% are illiterate, on the other hand, in afghanistan security, reaching for the people because of bad [indiscernible] because of the geographic afghanistan, it is hard to work, but it does not mean it will stop us. host: our guest abdul mujeeb khalvatgar is director of nai media institute. we're talking about journalism in afghanistan, how afghanis get their news and the freedom of the press in that country. we want to take your phone calls on this. the numbers -- here is the world news section of the "wall street journal." afghan peace still sought in six months. i am wondering, is this the type of headlines afghanis would see, the second to read the newspapers or have the newspape
adviser, and the director of the cia that there were weapons of mass destruction in iraq. so for a lot of the decisions that were made at the outset, they were decisions that were informed with incorrect information. as the committee is judging senator hagel on that decision, i want to tell the committee what was the experience of this senator. what i would like to do with my time here is that since there are few of us in this room that served in the military during the vietnam era, and you clearly have that experience in combat. senator hagel -- by the way, a lot of people don't know anything about vietnam and don't know how difficult it was as senator warner has so eloquently stated in his comments, how the nation was divided. what i would like for you as the committee is getting to know you, know something about your service in vietnam and your combat experience. were you wounded, senator hagel? >> senator nelson, thank you. if i may, if i read into your question, some latitude in answering. i would respond this way -- i think my time is better served may be talking about these spec
Search Results 0 to 8 of about 9